Creative Kid College Coach

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Posts tagged portfolio layout
BFA, BM, BArch, MFA will these credentials be worth anything?

Time and again I am asked by nervous parents about the career opportunities their students will have if they pursue a major in the visual arts.  "But will they find a job when they graduate?" is a common lament.  I can talk about the students that I have worked with who have gone on to be the happiest group of college students I have known.  I can describe the myriad of creative internships and opportunities for growth that are a direct correlation to the relationships creative students form with their professors.  I can list the places that students I know are now working professionally. But, people like statistics.  And data.  And graphs.  So, I am happy to refer you to the Strategic National Arts Alumni Project (SNAAP), a research effort led by Indiana and Vanderbilt Universities.  SNAAP surveyed over 13,000 graduates from 154 U.S. public and private college arts programs, conservatories and arts high schools.  These graduates have willingly responded to questions about access to jobs, satisfaction with their professions and the all important ability to support themselves doing something that they love.

Steven J. Tepper, Associate Professor, Department of Sociology, Vanderbilt University, writes in an article for the Huffington Post, "Arts graduates might not be rich, on average, but the vast majority is gainfully employed, piece together satisfying careers, and would go to art school again if given the choice."

So, for more detailed information about the valuable data that SNAAP has gathered, go to their website:  http://snaap.indiana.edu/snaapshot/ and see for yourself why a degree in the arts just might be the ticket to success and long-term career satisfaction.  Oh yes, and a job when you graduate!

High School Juniors it is time to get organized!

This is a very busy time for most high school juniors.  If you consider what most visual and performing arts students are doing right about now, staying organized and thinking about college probably isn't high on the list.  The thing to remember is, the more time you spend getting ready for the application season, the less stressed you will be at the beginning of your senior year.  So, here is a list of things that every junior interested in the arts should be doing:

  1. Tour colleges.  Make sure to visit the department you are interested in, which may require an additional appointment after the general campus tour.  If you have a portfolio or sketchbook, bring it along and make an appointment to see an admissions officer.  If you are not able to go for a visit, most schools provide online virtual tours.  You need to familiarize yourself with the various programs so that you can have a final list of schools to which you will apply by June.
  2. Keep a journal.  Start writing down your thoughts and ideas that may end up helping you to answer the various essay questions.  Take time to think about who or what has influenced you and why you want to pursue a certain course of study.
  3. Volunteer.  See my blog on volunteerism High School Junior Volunteers – Commit! Create! Contribute!.  I list websites to help you find volunteer opportunities.
  4. Visit galleries and museums.  Go to the movies.  See live performances.  You will be asked what you like and who influences you.  Not having an opinion because you have not been exposed to the creativity of others is no excuse.  Take the time to analyze what you like and what you don't.  This will all have an impact on your portfolio, audition and artist statement.
  5. Think about who you will ask for your letters of recommendation.  Do not let this school year end without having locked in the teachers you want to write your letters.
  6. Keep your resume current.  You will need this information for your applications and it will be much easier if you have everything in one place.  By working on your resume now, you will remember activities that are important to include as well as see areas where you need to focus.  Naviance and online resume templates will help you to get started.
  7. Take a deep breath.  This is an important time to learn that the more relaxed and focused you remain, the better off you will be.  Panic doesn't help and the more you remain true to yourself and your personal goals, the more likely you are to find a program and a school that is the perfect match for you.
Portfolio Workshop for High School Sophomores and Juniors

There are many things that high school juniors can do to make the college application process less stressful. Visit colleges, attend a pre-college program and of course, work on their portfolios. I have a created a workshop that will provide helpful information to students who intend to submit a portfolio or an Arts Supplement to the Common Application. Here are the details: Creating a Portfolio for College Admissions with Harriet Katz

Sunday, March 11, 2012 2:30 – 4:30 PM

Greenmeadow Community Center 303 Parkside Drive, Palo Alto CA 94306

The art portfolio is a definitive component to admission to any art program. In this two hour workshop, Harriet teaches you how to prepare your art application or Common Application Arts Supplement by reviewing the following crucial components:

* Elements/Contents of a portfolio: what work to include and exclude, how to find   inspiration and commitment in the work you select to present. *Portfolio Layout and Preparation: how to order and edit your work *Artist Statement: writing *Portfolio review: one-on-one reviews by Harriet

Presentation includes examples of student portfolios that have resulted in admission to such programs as The Rhode Island School of Design, The School of the Art Institute of Chicago, The Maryland Institute College of Art, NYU, USC and UCLA.

Register at hekatz@creativekcc.com or by calling Harriet at (650) 302-8053.

Tuition: $100 includes 2-hour presentation, portfolio review and materials. Limit: 15 Students